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Cutting Costs and Crime: Levin Quoted in New York Times

People across the country are beginning to wonder whether or not we are incarcerating ourselves out of an economy. After massive crackdowns on crime in the 90’s created hosts of stringent crimes and punishments, now millions of individuals find it almost impossible to get work. Criminal records, even for low-level non-violent offenses, can mean a life-time of rejection letters and welfare. But both sides of the table are beginning to realize this and are taking steps to mitigate it in the future. Right on Crime policy director Marc Levin was quoted in a New York Times article about the growth of conservatives’ awareness of the subject:

“There’s been a shift in people away from wanting to get even,” said Marc A. Levin, the policy director for Right on Crime, a conservative anti-crime group in Texas. “People are focused now on getting results. It really is a great benefit to public safety if ex-offenders are able to get jobs, find places to live and get occupational licenses — whether it’s from the perspective of the ex-offender or those of us who are going to live next to them.”

Read the article at the New York Times.

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Giving Kids Adult Records: Cohen and Fowler in the Dallas Morning News

Right on Crime | October 24, 2014
The Dallas Morning News published a piece by Right on Crime policy analyst Derek Cohen and Deborah Fowler, deputy director for Texas Appleseed. They write that, despite large criminal justice reform…
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